Feelin’ TV: November 20-26, 2017

Whenever a new movie/TV show is released based on a comic book property, the conversation about super hero fatigue begins. It gets louder every time, especially in months like this where the discussion around Thor: Ragnarok had barely died down before Justice League arrived in theaters. It’s completely understandable. A lot of people are burned out on the genre.
I do not suffer from that affliction. Give me more. I love the oversaturation. There is enough room in my heart for all of it. When I hear of something new, I’m all over it like white on rice in a glass of milk on a paper plate in a snow storm. I may not keep watching (Inhumans), I may quit watching and go back later because I have nothing else to do (Gotham), I may even hate watch (The Walking Dead) but more often than not, I watch and enjoy and put it securely in my regular rotation. It should be no surprise then, that I took the opportunity this week to check out (and fall in love with) Hulu’s new comic book series, Runaways.
Runaways is based on the Marvel comic of the same name. It’s set in the MCU along with the popular films and shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Inhumans, Daredevil, etc. It’s about six teenagers who find out that their parents are super villains who make up a team called Pride and begin to work together to thwart their plans. Along this journey of discovery, they also begin to develop powers of their own. I haven’t read the comic, so if you have, you probably have a better handle on what’s going on than I do at this point. From what I’ve read, fans of the print version have been pleased with the way the show has remained faithful to the source material. In the three episodes that have been released, creators Joshua Schwartz and Stephanie Savage have succeeded in crafting solid characters, both in the teens and their parents, not sacrificing the development of the villains in favor of the heroes. They’ve done so by taking their time to introduce characters and the world that they live in.
Hulu has been putting out some solid programming over the last few years. They seem to be a bit more concerned with quality over quantity in contrast to fellow streaming service Netflix. Thus far, Runaways continues that trend. It feels like more than an attempt to capitalize on the superhero craze. They’re laying the groundwork for a pretty intriguing story that I’m excited to add to the queue moving forward. Runaways is available on Hulu.

Channel Surfing:

  • The Arrowverse has a pretty big week coming up with their annual week of crossover episodes, so I had assumed that this week would mostly be table setting for that event. I was wrong. Supergirl saw the bittersweet return of Mon-El, The Flash came face to face with this season’s big bad The Thinker, Legends of Tomorrow had maybe the best Mick centered episode of the series and Oliver got arrested and vigilantes were made illegal in Star City on Arrow. But all of that will be on hold this week when all of the gang gets together for Barry and Iris’ wedding. Will everything run smoothly? Given that the whole ordeal is called Crisis on Earth-X, I’m guessing it won’t. It’s a tough thing to balance 4 shows into one storyline, but last season it was the best week of the year. Hopefully they can keep it up. Arrowverse shows can be seen on The CW.
  • This Is Us made me cry again this week. Chrissy Metz and Mandy Moore (Kate and Rebecca, respectively) play the two characters that get under my skin the most on that show (in a good way, like how members of your own family get under your skin). This week though, the story gave them both a chance to absolutely shine and they knocked it out of the park. I’ve heard people say that maybe the show leans a bit too heavy into sadness territory, and I think that’s a valid criticism, but I think the way it was portrayed this week was sensitive, thoughtful and accurate. Also, I’m going to start a petition to get NBC to give Toby his own show. I don’t care what it’s about. I just want more Toby. This Is Us airs weekly on NBC and past episodes can be seen on Hulu.

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Next week, we’re going to spend the bulk of our time talking about the Arrowverse crossover event and I’ll probably have a thing or two to say about the season premiere of the new season of Agents of SHIELD as well.


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: October 30-November 5, 2017

I think that a mark of a good show is its re-watchability. Sometimes I’ll love something the first time, but when I have a chance to watch it over again, I have little to no interest. Some shows, like The Office, Parks and Recreation or 30 Rock for example, are shows that I can watch and enjoy, start to finish, over and over again. Then, there’s the rarest of rare shows that get better every time you watch. I’m talking about Arrested Development.

I watched AD for at least the 5th or 6th time this week and I’m still blown away by it. There are set ups in season one that aren’t paid off until season three. There are gags that run further than any other gags in television history. There are things that make me laugh that I can’t even tell if its intentional or not (is it weird to anyone else that they refer to jelly beans as “candy beans”?) In previous viewings, I’ve been blown away by the intricacy of the story, enamored with the ability of Will Arnett and Jessica Walter to take over every scene they’re in as Gob and Lucile, the awkward existence of Michael Cera as George Michael and the creepy energy of David Cross as Tobias. This time though, I couldn’t stop admiring the straight man, Jason Bateman’s Michael Bluth.

The Bluth’s are wildly un-relatable. They’re rich, oblivious, and as characters, they’re ridiculously broad. I love each and every one of them, but I don’t think I would have been able to put up with them for more than an episode or two without Michael Bluth there to keep the show grounded…sort of. Through 3 seasons and 53 episodes (the Netflix season doesn’t count), whenever the rest of the Bluths threatened to take the show too far over the line into Crazy Town, Michael was there with a look or a perfectly timed quip to bring us right back down to earth. One of the biggest failings in Netflix’s attempt to bring the show back for a season four in my opinion is that Michael was as nuts as the rest of his family, losing its tether to normal people altogether. In a show full of perfectly cast characters, there may have been no one more perfectly suited to the show than Jason Bateman. If you haven’t seen it, I encourage you to give it a shot. If you have seen it, watch it again to rediscover its brilliance. Season five is coming in 2015 with a promise of episodes in the vein of seasons 1-3 and less season 4. Here’s hoping that’s the case. Arrested Development is available to stream on Netflix.

Channel Surfing:

  • The Arrowverse had a great week with a crazy fun episode of Supergirl involving Kara and Jonn flying a convertible to Mars, a Legends of Tomorrow that wrapped a tale about Ray Palmer’s childhood into an homage to ET and The Flash introduced Elongated Man into its universe. The best news this week though? MICHAEL EMERSON IS A BAD GUY ON ARROW! His character at this point seems to be the master of manipulation that we saw in Lost’s Ben Linus combined with the tech savy expertise of Person of Interest’s Mr. Finch. There may have been an audible squeal of glee in my living room when he showed up. This has been a stellar season all-around for the Arrowverse, and with Emerson around, it looks like it will continue trending up. The current season of Arrow, Supergirl, The Flash, and Legends of Tomorrow can be viewed on The CW app.
  • Thursday night NFL football is the worst. The games are always subpar because of the quick turnaround and the matchups are typically pretty lame. The worst part though, is that because of NBC’s commitment to Thursday Night Football, we don’t get to see any new episodes of The Good Place or Great News until the new year. Maybe it’s just sour grapes, but I hate TNF. Well, unless the Chiefs are playing. If you’re like me and you can see The Good Place withdrawals in your future, check out this video taken by Kristen Bell of the rest of the cast finding out about season one’s epic twist (spoilers, obvs).
  • I was remarking to a friend this week that out of all of my friends with kids, I don’t know anyone who has ever had a baby without making it to the hospital first (not counting my slightly crazy friends who have had their kids at home on purpose). But if my calculations are correct, roughly 90% of TV children are born that way. A This Is Us flashback added Randall’s oldest child to that statistic this week. It’s a pretty worn out trope, but overall, it was a strong episode that made me cry so I’ll forgive them for going to that well.
  • Oh, and The Walking Dead was awful. I’m going to need someone to spend some time in the Facebook group telling me why I should still be interested in this show.

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Happy viewing!


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: October 2-8, 2017

There’s a long and sordid history to the relationship between Marvel and 20th Century Fox when it comes to mutants. Marvel had the mutants, Fox bought the mutants, Fox made lots of money off of the mutants, Marvel would like to have the mutants back, but Fox, understandably, is a fan of making all of the money. In lieu of mutants, Marvel inserted Inhumans (who are pretty much space mutants as opposed to genetic mutants) into its MCU via the Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD program and had solid results that helped the show find its voice. Now Fox has its mutants and Marvel has its mutants and because everything now gets made into a television show, we’ve come to this; a 2017 Fall TV Battle Royale of mutants featuring ABC’s Inhumans versus Fox’s The Gifted

The Gifted was a tight little pilot that told us what we needed to know about the world. Mutants exist, but they’re illegal and they’re being hunted. Our main characters are the Strucker’s. Reed Strucker is a lawyer who helps prosecute mutants, his son Andy’s struggle with being bullied reveals latent mutant powers, his daughter Lauren reveals mutant powers she’s been hiding to rescue her brother, and now the family is on the run to Mexico with a group of mutants that Mr. Strucker was previously trying to put behind bars. It’s short and sweet and to this point, uncomplicated. It succeeds because it focuses on character and not on spectacle. The cast is led by the amazing Amy Acker as Kate, the matriarch of the Strucker family. The way they make the decision on a dime to leave their life behind to protect their children and live as fugitives and the fact that they don’t really have any idea how to live life on the run rings true to life and immediately makes them feel like a real family. What makes X-Men so great is that behind all of the world saving are small stories of people learning to be unafraid of who they are. The Gifted appears to understand that and I’m very much looking forward to the rest of the season.

Inhumans is an absolute mess. They live on the moon apparently, and they have a king and queen and some sort of ruling counsel, but there’s been a power struggle recently and there is some unrest. The king is Black Bolt and his queen is Medusa. They appear happy together, but the king’s brother Maximus (played by Game of Thrones’ Iwan Rheon) thinks that they should be living on earth for…reasons…and he’s sure enough that he’s right that he stages a coup to seize control of the kingdom. Unfortunately for him, his plan to have his brother and sister in law arrested backfires and instead they’re taken to earth by the queen’s sister, who has all-time bad hair, and her giant teleporting dog. If that seems at all clear, then the show should hire me as a writer because it’s not at all clear on the screen. Adding to the poorly told story are multiple groan worthy performances, eye-roll inducing levels of blurted out exposition and fight choreography that immediately reminded me of my early teenage obsession with the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. It’s awful, it’s terrible, and I don’t know if I’ll watch anymore because I hated it.

I’m not usually one to totally give up on a show after one episode, but if Inhumans vs. The Gifted were a boxing match, Inhumans fell twice and was saved by the bell from a TKO in the first round. The difference in the quality, acting, direction, effects, etc. between the two shows was night and day. So to summarize: If you’re only going to watch one show about mutants this season, watch The Gifted. If you’re going to watch two, watch The Gifted twice. Both The Gifted and Inhumans can be streamed on Hulu.com.

 

Channel Surfing:

  • This Is Us is officially 2 for 2 in making me cry in this young season. I had someone ask me this week what makes the show so good and my answer was simply that it feels more real than most television. Things don’t come easy for these characters. They make decisions to do things and they fall on their face. But they always get back up again with help from their family. I know that not everyone has that experience with their families, but I’m blessed to be able to say that I do. And the family on This Is Us reminds me of my family. We can be intrusive and annoying and neurotic, but we’re also always there. Season 2 is off to a good start. This Is Us can be streamed at Hulu.com or at NBC.com.
  • Designated Survivor is back and it’s still not a good show. But it’s pretty fun. One large dangling thread from season one was wrapped up this week, but I’m sure something else bad will be coming down the pike pretty soon. If this show becomes West Wing, it will be unwatchable. It’s a show that blew up the Capitol in the cold open of it’s pilot. It’s stakes need to be ridiculous, so I hope they keep it that way.
  • I caught a new show this week that I’m hoping will stick around long enough to stick around for a while called Kevin (Probably) Saves the World. It stars Jason Ritter as Kevin, a down on his luck former high school hot shot who returns to his hometown to live with his twin sister and her daughter after the death of her husband. I don’t want to say more, I just want you to watch it. The pilot was the perfect combo of funny and heart-warming and it was the second show of the week to make me cry. Kevin (Probably) Saves the World can be streamed at Hulu.com or at ABC.com.
  • I’m going to recommend a documentary that you can check out on Netflix even though that’s probably technically out of my lane. But it’s only 40 minutes long, so it’s like a 1 hour TV special, which would be in my lane. It’s called Long Shot and I’m not going to tell you anything about it except that it’s intriguing and surprising and absolutely delightful. Don’t read about it or watch Netflix’s trailer, just watch the show. You can thank me later.

That’s all for this week. Next week, the Arrowverse is back! I’m sure I’ll have plenty to say about that. If there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group.