FF+ Cyber Shorts VR Film Festival Creator & Winner Interviews

Interviews with Darryl Armstrong, Festival Co-Director, and the filmmakers behind the winning shorts of the inaugural Cyber Shorts VR Film Festival.

Darryl Armstrong

Elvert Baneres (Dreams Aren’t Made By the Wind) – 0:14:50

Georgia Harter (Not Your Bible) – 0:34:43

Danny Chandia & Rachel Johnson (Violent Water) – 0:49:23

Darryl Armstrong

Elvert Baneres

Georgia Harter

Danny Chandia & Rachel Johnson

Aaron

Patrick

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Music: City Sunshine – Kevin MacLeod

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2019 Seattle International Film Festival Capsule Reviews

Each year the Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) screens hundreds of feature films, documentaries, short films, and more from all around the world over a 25-day period in May and June. This year the largest and most highly attended festival in the United States will run from May 16 – June 9 and show 410 films representing 86 countries, a lineup which includes 36 World premieres, 40 North American premieres, and 19 U.S. premieres. 55% of films come from 1st or 2nd time filmmakers, 46% are made by women filmmakers, and 56% of Feature Competition films are directed by women. The festival will screen several highly anticipated films such as Late Night starring Emma Thompson and Mindy Kaling, The Farewell starring Awkwafina, and Sword of Trust written and directed by local filmmaker Lynn Shelton. As part of this year’s celebration of women in comedy, SIFF will be presenting the Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinema to Regina Hall. Suffice it to say, all 410 films won’t be covered here, but in addition to our podcast coverage of the festival you will find capsule reviews of a wide variety of films across many genres. Check back often for new capsule reviews as we cover the 45th Annual Seattle International Film Festival. (Reviews are in order of film’s earliest showing.)

Must See: THE FAREWELL, MILES DAVIS: BIRTH OF THE COOL

Recommended: MONOS, Q BALL, ROLL RED ROLL

Worth Watching: PACHAMAMA, WHO LET THE DOGS OUT

Skip: AN AFFAIR, COLD SWEAT


MONOS (102 minutes)

Nightmarish, unquestionably dark, and challenging, this story about eight teenage guerrilla fighters in the mountainous jungles of Columbia feels like a hallucinatory mix between LORD OF THE FLIES and APOCALYPSE NOW infused with the contemplative musing of Terrance Malick. Much is left unknown narratively, but the film excels in style. It features outstanding nuanced and intense performances, stunning landscape cinematography, and an incredible, haunting synthetic score from Mica Levi which lead to a sensory experience that evokes a range of conflicting emotions. MONOS is a captivating and unpredictable original work that won’t appeal to everyone, but has the ability to floor those who let themselves become invested. – Aaron White

Rating:

Showtimes: May 17 – 3:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), May 20 – 9:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian)

[Get Tickets]


Q BALL (97 minutes)

The famous San Quentin Prison is California’s oldest, and the only one which houses male inmates on death row (the nation’s largest). This Kevin Durant produced film from Michael Tolajian focuses, however, on a rehabilitation program at the correctional facility for the general population, specifically a prison basketball team called the San Quentin Warriors (in honor of their local NBA squad). Over the course of this slickly produced and emotionally powerful documentary, we meet men incarcerated for crimes from domestic violence to gun possession to murder, all seeking redemption and community within the sport they love. Concentrating primarily on highly talented former collegiate athlete Harry “ATL” Smith and his road to parole as the Warriors play through a season against community teams from outside their walls, the film paints a beautiful picture of how basketball is universal and can be “a bridge between worlds” as well as a vehicle for growth. It is a compassionate but fair look at these men, always wrestling with their actions of the past, while trying to be better in the present to earn the hope of a future. Though never diverging to tackle bigger issues like the over-incarceration of people of color or unfair sentencing laws, Q BALL is an inspirational reminder about the power of sport and the need for rehabilitation programs that set up inmates to succeed when their time behind bars is through. – Aaron White

Rating:

 

The kind of heartwarming stories you love to see; a film that shows us the redemptive qualities of a sport like basketball and how it operates as rehabilitation doubling as a place of peace for prisoners at the infamous San Quentin Prison. We follow a select number of convicts who detail their own personal stories on how basketball has given them a new sense of purpose. They detail the reasoning for why they are in prison, the mistakes they have made, and how being involved with a team sport has been the source for new change, hope, and a way to be free amidst the daily reality of life behind bars. It touches your heart and showcases the possibilities and potential for people to change if they are given the opportunities and resources to do so. I’m a sucker for anything sports related in film but this felt more poignant and deeper than sports. – Caless Davis

Rating:

Showtimes: May 17 – 6:30 pm (Ark Lodge Cinemas), May 18 – 12:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown),

May 21 – 3:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown)

[Get Tickets]


WHO LET THE DOGS OUT (70 minutes)

Director Brent Hodge (A BRONY TALE, FREAKS & GEEKS: THE DOCUMENTARY) loves exploring unique stories about popular culture. His latest film follows Ben Sisto, a man who was browsing the Wikipedia entry for the hit song “Who Let the Dogs Out” one day when a spark of curiosity hit. Over the next 8 years, Ben traveled the globe from Seattle to Nassau to England, attempting to nail down the origin of this memorable tune, and in the process uncovered a disputed history of the iconic song that includes a six-year legal battle and several ruined relationships. Though it’s certainly not life-changing, the investigative reporting style, which includes interviews with everyone from eclectic artists to sound engineers, and Ben’s charming personality, make this short, informative documentary an entertaining look into one of the most unforgettable songs to ever get stuck in your head. – Aaron White

Rating:

Showtimes: May 17 – 7:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), May 19 – 6:30 pm (AMC Pacific Place),

May 25 – 8:30 pm (Shoreline Community College)

[Get Tickets]


AN AFFAIR (90 minutes)

AN AFFAIR comes off as a retread of what I’ve seen the few unfortunate times I have watched a Lifetime original film. Devoid of a plot that is more than simple in execution, lack of character development so that we can understand the decision and behaviors of the people we follow, a lack of awareness when it comes to character making decisions, and bare minimum acting. The film is centered on an affair between a teacher and student at a high school and then the teacher becomes obsessed with carrying on this blurred relationship, losing her sense off morality in a faulty attempt at recapturing a spark long missing from her love life. My biggest issue outside of the flaws I have noted is that the story is in a rush to showcase this steamy affair but we don’t know why this woman is willing to risk her marriage to be with this young teenager; we don’t get any exploration into her marriage or the internal strife she may be dealing with. Any information we do get is put towards the end of the film in the form of cheap exposition; by the time you get any understanding the film is over. I was excited to see this when I saw the change of pace of a teacher being obsessed with a student but honestly this is a big letdown when it had the opportunity to be a compelling drama. – Caless Davis

Rating:

Showtimes: May 19 – 9:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian), May 20 – 3:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown)

[Get Tickets]


PACHAMAMA (72 minutes)

This visually lush and magical animated tale from Latin America is a delightful depiction of culture in the Andes as the Spanish Conquest looms large over a peaceful farming village. The children’s story follows a young boy who dreams of becoming a shaman as he embarks on a hero’s journey to retrieve a seized religious relic from a representative of the nearby city’s ruling “god”. Accompanied by his wise and faithful female friend, plus two adorable animal sidekicks, their colorful heartfelt adventure is as entertaining as it is educational. – Aaron White

Rating:

Showtimes: May 19 – 11:00 am (AMC Pacific Place), May 27 – 1:00 pm (Lincoln Square)

[Get Tickets]


ROLL RED ROLL (80 minutes)

* Trigger warning for details of real-life sexual assault

“Boys will be boys” fuels the dangerous culture exposed in this documentary that shines a light on a 2012 rape case in Steubenville, OH. Director Nancy Schwartzman shows how a local crime blogger, and later the hacktivist group Anonymous, helped force a city to reckon with the awful sexual assault of a young girl by two star HS football players. The sheer lack of empathy from the teenage boys, victim-blaming, and protection of the abusers by adults is infuriating, disturbing, and gut-wrenching, but hopefully this serves as gripping call to action that will encourage others to stand against this behavior in the future. – Aaron White

Rating:

Showtimes: May 20 – 4:30 pm (Majestic Bay), May 28 – 6:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown),

May 29 – 4:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown)

[Get Tickets]


COLD SWEAT (85 minutes)

COLD SWEAT is a film that has its heart in the right place but does not fully use its message about women living under the patriarchal rule of their husbands in foreign countries to say anything substantial. We follow an Iranian female soccer player who is banned from leaving the country with her team because her husband did not give her permission to leave. Her career is jeopardized and there is no organization or anyone that is willing to help at all because the law is the law. Baran Kosari in the leading role gives us a powerful performance displaying the pain that comes with being a women in the developed world that faces major obstacles to being truly free and not just a piece of property. We see a couple of scenes that show just how little power women have in their own space; they need permission from their husband to do most of the things that women in other countries may take for granted, even something as wanting a divorce puts the women in a big disadvantage as far to whether she can even leave because all of the decision making lies with the man. Sadly the film does not go into more detail of this unbalanced structure and the oppression women face in this kind of life; they instead turn the narrative into a constant back and forth between an estranged husband and wife. Feels basic in the overall sense and the story could have had much more impact with its take on this occurrence in some foreign countries. – Caless Davis

Rating:

Showtimes: May 21 – 6:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), May 26 – 6:00 pm (Lincoln Square)

[Get Tickets]


MILES DAVIS: BIRTH OF THE COOL (115 minutes)

A brilliant documentary that examines one of the more beloved figures in music history. Calling Miles Davis unique would be an understatement; he is the personification of evolution and creativity. Stanley George’s masterwork examines the illustrious career of the jazz legend through interviews from musicians and friends alike; never before seen photos and footage that capture the essence and marvel of a man who held the hearts and ears of many generations of jazz aficionados. We see the good and bad attributes that Miles possessed revealing to us a full picture of the man himself. If you are a lover of the documentary genre and music, this is a supreme treat. – Caless Davis

Rating:

Showtimes: May 29 – 6:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian), May 31 – 4:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown)

[Get Tickets]


THE FAREWELL (98 minutes)

Lulu Wang’s heartfelt story about a Chinese family navigating their matriarch’s recent cancer diagnosis via a surprising lie is filled with poignant drama and tender comedy. It is both informative of Chinese culture and insightful into challenges faced by Chinese-American immigrants in ways that are tremendously affecting. Awkwafina stars in a break-out performance with incredible depth, but is backed by an equally wonderful supporting cast. Wang’s character framing shots are brilliant, the score is excellent, and everything works together beautifully to make THE FAREWELL one of this year’s first must-see indies. – Aaron White

Rating:

Showtimes: June 9 – 6:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian) – Closing Gala

[Get Tickets]


Aaron White is a Seattle-based film critic and co-creator/co-host of the Feelin’ Film Podcast. He is also a member of the Seattle Film Critics Society. He writes reviews with a focus on the emotional experience he has with a film. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter to be notified when new content is posted.

 

 

Caless Davis is a Seattle-based film critic and contributor to the Feelin’ Film Podcast. He loves any discussion of film and meeting new people to engage in film discussions on any subject. You can follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

2018 Seattle International Film Festival Capsule Reviews

Each year the Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) screens hundreds of feature films, documentaries, short films, and more from all around the world over a 25-day period in May and June. This year the largest and most highly attended festival in the United States will run from May 25 – June 10 and show 433 films representing 90 countries, a lineup which includes 35 World premieres, 46 North American premieres, and 25 U.S. premieres. The festival will screen several highly anticipated films such as First Reformed starring Ethan Hawke, Sorry To Bother You starring Lakeith Stanfield, and a documentary about Fred Rogers that is sure to make you cry, Won’t You Be My Neighbor. Suffice it to say, all 433 films won’t be covered here, but in addition to our podcast coverage of the festival you will find capsule reviews of a wide variety of films across many genres. Check back often for new capsule reviews as we cover the 44th Annual Seattle International Film Festival. (Newest reviews on top.)

Must See: HEARTS BEAT LOUD, REVENGE, WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?, FIRST REFORMED, BODIED

Recommended: MOUNTAIN, CHAMPIONS, THE RUSSIAN FIVE, CATWALK: TALES FROM THE CAT SHOW CIRCUIT, AMERICAN ANIMALS

Worth Watching: DON’T WORRY HE WON’T GET FAR ON FOOT, THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS, BEAST, MICHELIN STARS: TALES FROM THE KITCHEN

Skip: LITTLE TITO AND THE ALIENS


DON’T WORRY, HE WON’T GET FAR ON FOOT (120 minutes)

Joaquin Phoenix transforms into the wheelchair-bound recovering alcoholic John Callahan in Gus Van Sant’s biopic about the famous Portland cartoonist. Phoenix’s powerful and wide-ranging emotional performance is matched by the most vulnerable work of Jonah Hill’s career as he portrays Callahan’s AA group leader and friend. Don’t Worry is an often humorous, thoughtful look at the challenge of dealing with addiction and affliction, but it also features an odd use of non-linear storytelling and wastes the talented Rooney Mara in a forgettable role as Callahan’s trophy girlfriend. See it for the stand-out acting and ultimate message of hope.

Rating:


THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS (98 minutes)

In this stunningly true story, triplets separated at birth discover one another and fall into brotherly love before deeper, darker secrets are revealed regarding the circumstances of their detachment. Compelling right from the start, high energy and an intriguing structure keep this documentary fresh as it considers the age old question of nature vs. nurture. At its best when telling of the boys’ experiences while both together and growing up apart, the film isn’t quite as strong after its shocking reveal and during its subsequent exploration of why this all happened. The tragedy of the tale is incredibly emotional and thought-provoking, though, making us consider the line between humanity and science through the lens of very real people whose lives were dictated for them in ways they never expected.

Rating:

[All SIFF showings have passed; wide release on June 29, 2018]


HEARTS BEAT LOUD (98 minutes)

Hearts Beat Loud is not just the witty title of this third feature film from Brett Haley, but also a prophetic description of the physiological response it evokes. Frank (Nick Offerman) is stellar as a hip, but childish, widowed father whose last vestige of connection with his soon-to-be med student daughter Sam (Kiersey Clemons) is a shared love of music. The catchy tunes they create bring out the feels but this thoughtful, realistic story about coping with the challenges that life brings keeps us emotionally invested through its charming, heartwarming exploration of parenthood, love, and facing the future.

Rating:

[All SIFF showings have passed; wide release on June 8, 2018]


MOUNTAIN (74 minutes)

Like a poetic love letter to the mystical draw of the mountaintop, Willem Dafoe’s smooth voice (backed by the symphonic tones of the Australian Chamber Orchestra) narrates this awe-inspiring journey through the history of man’s relationship with some of the most imposing natural structures on the planet. Cinematographer Renan Ozturk’s stunning high-altitude imagery of mountains all across the world is a visual delight and worthy of the biggest theater screen possible, though viewers with a fear of heights are in for a terrifying experience.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 21 – 7:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian), May 22 – 7:00 pm (Majestic Bay)

[Get Tickets]


LITTLE TITO AND THE ALIENS (92 minutes)

In this playful science fiction dramedy, Tito and Anita travel to America to live with their widowed scientist uncle after their father passes away in Italy. The Professor, living as a recluse in the Nevada desert near Area 51, has stalled in his work on a top secret government project, but the arrival of his niece and nephew force him to confront not only his own grief but theirs as well. Featuring elements that echo Spielberg’s work (down to a very similar score), Little Tito and the Aliens has some heartfelt moments but is too scattered and derivative to be very highly recommended.

Rating:

Showtimes: June 7 – 7:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), June 8 – 4:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian)

June 10 – 4:30 pm (AMC Pacific Place)

[Get Tickets]


CHAMPIONS (CAMPEONES) (120 minutes)

Champions is another feel-good, family-friendly story about a judgmental and egotistical person who learns to accept others through spending time with them. But despite following a typical trajectory right up to a completely telegraphed ending, Director/Writer Javier Fesser’s film is so charming and funny that it simply doesn’t matter if you could write the plot yourself. Anchored by an incredible cast of performers as basketball players with intellectual disabilities and a genuinely emotional turn by star Javier Gutierrez as their new coach, Champions is an enjoyable, inspiring story that will warm the heart.

Rating:

Showtimes: June 1 – 9:00 pm (Kirkland Performance Center), June 8 – 6:15 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown) w/ Director Q&A

June 9 – 3:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown) w/ Director Q&A

[Get Tickets]


THE RUSSIAN FIVE (99 minutes)

Joshua Riehl’s documentary comes at the perfect time for a Seattle community starving for a hockey team of their own. The best sports documentaries take a topic many know and unpack hidden history. The Russian Five tells of how the Detroit Red Wings forever changed the NHL by bringing in talented Russian players, sometimes at risk of their lives and well-being of their families. Filled with awesome archival game footage and interviews, Riehl’s film echoes the rock star quality of its subjects and is a shocking, heartbreaking, and ultimately triumphant story about family and determination in sports.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 19 – 5:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown) w/ Director Q&A, May 20 – 6:00 pm (Majestic Bay) w/ Director Q&A

May 29 – 9:00 pm (Shoreline)

[Get Tickets]


BODIED (121 minutes, R)

Director Joseph Kahn is most known for high-profile music videos, but alongside producer Eminem he takes on the rap battle scene in this high intensity, satirical, lyrical exploration of PC culture as we know it today. Bodied follows white progressive grad student Adam on his journey from researching battle rap to competing himself. It’s smart script constantly spits fire and offends every race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation and more while inviting viewers to consider how much words matter. Added visual flourish reminds of Scott Pilgrim and the rap battles themselves are sure to become the stuff of legend.

Rating:

Showtimes: June 9 – 9:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian), June 10 – 9:15 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian)

[Get Tickets]


AMERICAN ANIMALS (116 minutes, R)

Director Bart Layton leverages his history with documentaries in this bold feature debut about four privileged real-life college friends who rely on their knowledge of movies to plan and execute a rare book heist. With a unique style that overlays interviews of the actual subjects into the narrative, this exhilarating crime drama is notable in how it depicts differing perspectives of how the events unfolded. Slick, stylish, and often hilarious, the film does suffer from pacing issues in its purely dramatic sections, but this fresh take on the sub-genre is a fascinating experience.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 19 – 9:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), May 20 – 1:30 pm (AMC Pacific Place) w/ Director Q&A

[Get Tickets]


FIRST REFORMED (113 minutes, R)

Known for his transcendental style and self-destructive characters, legendary writer/director Paul Schrader’s latest film stars Ethan Hawke in an arguably career-best performance as a former military chaplain turned small church pastor wrestling with despair, physical ailments, and an increasingly critical view of how the modern church operates. An intellectually profound script regarding matters of faith and environmentalism is coupled with careful artistic direction that creates a simmering emotional experience. This is a dark, unsettling character drama interested more in asking questions than providing answers – but for those who engage, it can be a powerful conversation-starter and trigger for self-reflection.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 18 – 4:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Egyptian), May 22 – 7:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown)

[Get Tickets]


WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR? (93 minutes)

Bring the tissues for this story about Fred Rogers, the iconic and innovative television personality with a heart for children and unwavering hope to see every person loved and respected for who they are. Fred’s sense of ministry and passion for child development helped him make Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood a safe place for learning that was radical in its time and unreplicated to this day. Through the use of interviews and historical context, Oscar-winning Director Morgan Neville thoroughly explores who Rogers was and shows his lessons are still needed today more than ever.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 26 – 6:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), May 27 – 1:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown)

[Get Tickets]


CATWALK: TALES FROM THE CAT SHOW CIRCUIT (75 minutes)

People love cats. Some people love cats so much that they travel the country attending what amounts to a beauty contest for their feline companion, and Catwalk: Tales from the Cat Show Circuit tells some of these amusing stories while detailing the surprisingly complex and competitive world of cat shows as seen through the nail-biting race for #1 between puffy red Persian Ooh La La and playful Turkish Angora Bobby. Thoroughly entertaining and full of gorgeous kitty cinematography, this sweet, fun and informative documentary is a joy for the whole family (pets included).

Rating:

Showtimes: May 19 – 3:30 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), May 20 – 1:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown), June 2 – 3:30 pm (Shoreline)

[Get Tickets]


MICHELIN STARS: TALES FROM THE KITCHEN (82 minutes)

Early in this documentary from Danish director Rasmus Dinesen, one renowned chef calls the famous restaurant grading Michelin Guide, “the most important guide in the world,” and for those chasing the ultra-elusive Michelin Star it is. Dinesen travels around the world learning about both the trials and glory that come from seeking the culinary world’s highest rating. The film is less concerned with specific dishes, but still features plenty of mouth-watering cinematography while providing a fair and balanced conversation about the Guide’s history and place in the restaurant world today.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 21 – 6:30 pm (Lincoln Square), May 23 – 6:00 pm (SIFF Cinema Uptown) [Get Tickets]


BEAST (107 minutes, R)

Haunting and suspenseful, director Michael Pearce’s feature film debut Beast is a slow-burn thriller that takes its time alternating between moments of high intensity and quiet psychological depth. It is anchored by an incredible, star-making first performance by Jessie Buckley, as a troubled young girl in an isolated island community who engages in a relationship with a mysterious stranger being investigated for multiple murders. The film is heavy in metaphor and takes a little too long to resolve, but its crescendo to the finale is powerful and quite memorable.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 20 – 8:00 pm (Ark Lodge Cinemas), May 21 – 9:30 pm (AMC Pacific Place) [Get Tickets]


REVENGE (108 minutes, R)

With the heart-pounding, blood-pumping Revenge, French filmmaker Coralie Fargeat bursts onto the scene in a ferocious manner. This heavily stylized rape-revenge has a considerably unique feel due to its female director turning the tables on the male gaze at every corner and offering a female protagonist with plenty of agency. Bloody, remarkably intense, and backed by a fantastic soundtrack, it’s a gorgeously shot violent payback session that is so slick and entertaining that it overcomes its slightly long runtime and is accessible enough that even non-fans of exploitation films can enjoy.

Rating:

Showtimes: May 18 – Midnight (SIFF Cinema Egyptian) [Get Tickets]


Aaron White is a Seattle-based film critic and co-creator/co-host of the Feelin’ Film Podcast. He is also a member of the Seattle Film Critics Society. He writes reviews with a focus on the emotional experience he has with a film. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter to be notified when new content is posted.

SIFF 2018 Coverage #2

In this second round of Seattle International Film Festival coverage, Matt Oakes from Silver Screen Riot joins Aaron to discuss and make recommendations for some of the films they’ve seen. (Showtimes for SIFF screenings are included with each review.)

Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF): https://www.siff.net/festival

Eighth Grade – 0:04:21

American Animals – 0:09:26

Boundaries – 0:15:35

Revenge – 0:21:04

Blue My Mind – 0:27:33

First Reformed – 0:32:32

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? – 0:43:47


Contact


Join the Facebook Discussion Group

Support us on Patreon & get awesome rewards

Music: Going Higher – Bensound.com

Rate/Review us on iTunes and on your podcast app of choice! It helps bring us exposure so that we can get more people involved in the conversation. Thank you!

Download this Episode


Music: Going Higher – Bensound.com

Support us on Patreon & get awesome rewards:

or you can support us through Paypal as well. Select the link below and make your one-time or recurring contribution.

Rate/Review us on iTunes and on your podcast app of choice! It helps bring us exposure so that we can get more people involved in the conversation. Thank you!

SIFF 2018 Coverage #1

The 44th Seattle International Film Festival runs from May 17, 2018 through June 10, 2018 and Aaron is joined by returning guest host, and fellow Seattle film critic, Mike Ward to discuss some of the many films SIFF has to offer moviegoers this year.

Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF): https://www.siff.net/festival

Beast – 0:12:03

Catwalk: Tales From the Cat Show Circuit – 0:19:00

Champions (Campeones) – 0:26:13

The Russian Five – 0:33:38

On Chesil Beach – 0:42:50

Bodied – 0:47:54

Mountain – 0:55:13


Contact


Join the Facebook Discussion Group

Support us on Patreon & get awesome rewards

Music: Going Higher – Bensound.com

Rate/Review us on iTunes and on your podcast app of choice! It helps bring us exposure so that we can get more people involved in the conversation. Thank you!

Download this Episode


Music: Going Higher – Bensound.com

Support us on Patreon & get awesome rewards:

or you can support us through Paypal as well. Select the link below and make your one-time or recurring contribution.

Rate/Review us on iTunes and on your podcast app of choice! It helps bring us exposure so that we can get more people involved in the conversation. Thank you!

Festival Minisode: SIFF Coverage #2

Welcome back to another episode of Feelin’ Film Plus. Returning for another conversation about the Seattle International Film Festival is Mike Ward, a fellow Seattle film critic whose insightful reviews always break down the pros and cons to help us answer that most important of questions, SHOULD I SEE IT? In this episode we discuss a variety of films covering multiple genres such as drama, comedy, science fiction, and (as always) documentaries. 

Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF): https://www.siff.net/festival

Landline – 0:09:34

Time Trap – 0:20:25

Entanglement – 0:29:04

STEP – 0:42:20

The Work – 0:53:09

The Farthest/The Last Animals –  1:07:12

Contact

Join the Facebook Discussion Group


Intro/Outro Music – “Seeing the Future” by Dexter Britain

Support us on Patreon & get awesome rewards:

or you can support us through Paypal as well. Select the link below and make your one-time or recurring contribution.

Rate/Review us on iTunes and on your podcast app of choice! It helps bring us exposure so that we can get more people involved in the conversation. Thank you!

Festival Minisode: SIFF Coverage #1

The Seattle International Film Festival starts May 18, 2017 and Aaron is joined by guest host, and fellow Seattle film critic, Mike Ward to discuss some of the many films SIFF has to offer moviegoers this year. The guys take a spoiler-free approach in this conversation and try to answer the question that Mike focuses on in his reviews, “Should I see it?” There is a wealth of incredible art to discover so listen close and then seek out some of these amazing films.

Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF): https://www.siff.net/festival

Mike Ward

Twitter – @ShouldISeeIt
Website: http://shouldiseeit.net


Handsome Devil – 0:11:34

Ethel & Ernest – 0:21:33

The Fabulous Allan Carr – 0:30:33

The Force – 0:42:12

Bad Black – 1:01:07   


Intro/Outro Music – “Seeing the Future” by Dexter Britain

Support us on Patreon & get awesome rewards:

or you can support us through Paypal as well. Select the link below and make your one-time or recurring contribution.

Rate/Review us on iTunes and on your podcast app of choice! It helps bring us exposure so that we can get more people involved in the conversation. Thank you!