Feelin’ TV: July 24-30

In the spring of 2002, a group of comic actors including hardworking character actor Paul Rudd, new Saturday Night Live cast member Amy Poehler and Hollywood newcomers Bradley Cooper and Elizabeth Banks, now all household names, got together with director David Wain to make the 80’s summer camp comedy spoof Wet Hot American Summer. The film, which also stars such comedy mainstays as Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Ian Black, Joe Lo Truglio, Ken Marino, Christopher Meloni and the great H. Jon Benjamin (who lends his voice talents to a talking can of vegetables) was a box office and critical flop at the time. Since that spring though, the film, penned by Wain and Michael Showalter, has aged like a fine wine. It’s a glorious, self-aware little movie that chronicles the last day of summer camp in 1981. It’s relentless in the number of jokes it throws at the wall, not taking the time to come back and see which ones stick.

While a lot of the content that Netflix has found it necessary to revive has been mediocre (Fuller House) to poor (Arrested Development Season Four), the 2015 revival of Wet Hot American Summer that chronicled the first day at Camp Firewood in a short 8-episode season was inspired. It took everything that worked well about the film and gave us more. It added the talents of Jon Hamm, Chris Pine, Jason Schwarzman and many others. It worked well enough that last week, Netflix gave us 8 more short episodes to hang with our campers. Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later is completely insane. To outline the plot here in a way that made any sense at all would be impossible. Suffice it to say, it’s a lot of poking fun at early 90’s nostalgia (seriously, the number of times we hear about B. Dalton Booksellers is astounding) mixed with the exaggerated versions of the tropes we’ve come to expect from movies and TV shows about reunions. If that isn’t enough, there’s a good bit intrigue in the B plot involving Ronald Reagan, the first President Bush and a nuclear warhead. The humor is as broad as the Atlantic Ocean but has the depth of a baby pool, but man, is it a lot of fun. Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later is currently streaming on Netflix.

If one were judging the merits of an episode of Game of Thrones based on the number of memorable scenes, this week’s episode would have to be one of the best of the series. Arya’s return to Winterfell and her sparring session with Brienne, Bran’s interaction with Littlefinger, Dothraki soldiers in battle on the open field and, of course, large amounts of dragon fire, were all moments that brought waves of satisfaction to long-time fans of the show. But “The Spoils of War” is an episode that didn’t add up to the sum of its parts.

Last week I discussed the hastening of the action of Game of Thrones and mentioned how I was enjoying the change of pace. This week, I’ll admit, I’m beginning to change my tune. It isn’t even taking characters an entire episode to travel across continents. They’re going ridiculous amounts of distance, from Dragonstone to Casterly Rock for example, in between scenes. It’s all becoming a little too convenient for my taste, and I don’t think I’m alone. So while it was pretty cool to see the Mother of Dragons ride Drogon into battle and Arya’s long awaited reunion with Sansa, overall, this was my least favorite episode of the season.

What say you? Do you think that GoT needs to slow its roll? Who saved Jamie from the wrath of Drogon? What will become of him when he surfaces? Leave your thoughts in the comments or our Facebook group. Game of Thrones can be viewed Sunday nights on HBO or streamed on the HBO NOW and HBO GO platforms.

That’s all for this week! Leave us your thoughts in the comments. If there’s anything you’d like to see covered that hasn’t been yet, let us know.

Feelin’ TV: July 10-16

Parks and Recreation is the greatest sitcom of all time. That’s not scientifically provable or anything, but I believe it with all my heart. I spent the last month watching the series all the way through for the sixth time. Even if you disagree with me about it being the best ever, I doubt you’ll be able to point to a comedy that had as perfect of a two-season run as Parks and Rec did for seasons 3 and 4 of its run. Even when it wasn’t great, it was still really good. Because at Feelin’ Film, we really like making lists, I decided that I would submit my picks for the best five episodes of Parks and Recreation:

5. One Last Ride (S7E12) – The final couple of seasons might have relied a little too heavily on giving its characters everything they ever wanted, and that shortcoming is definitely on full display in the series finale. But, man, it’s so good that I just don’t even care. I get tears all around as we get to see what Leslie (Amy Poehler) and the gang are up to in the future, especially when it comes to the fate of my spirit animal, Ron Swanson (Nick Offerman).

4. Practice Date (S2E4) – This is the only episode on my list from before Ben Wyatt (Adam Scott) and Chris Traeger’s (Rob Lowe) arrival in Pawnee. The A story provides a lot of comedy as Ann (Rashida Jones) takes Leslie on a practice date to help calm the nerves she’s feeling about her first date with Dave (Louis CK). While hearing about all of Leslie’s nightmarish first dates is a lot of fun, what makes this episode so memorable for me is its B story, where all of the other members of the parks department are having a contest to see how much dirt they can dig up on their co-workers. It’s our first introduction to Duke Silver and its where we really start to get to know Jerry Gergich (Jim O’Heir) as the office punching bag. It’s a lot of fun.

3. Fancy Party (S3E9) – My favorite couple on Parks is April (Aubrey Plaza) and Andy (Chris Pratt), hands down. April’s perpetually annoyed demeanor plays off of Andy’s wide-eyed man-child to a form a relationship that managed to feel both inevitable and wildly implausible at the same time. That they would invite their friends and family to bring components of a party to their house (Ben’s items to bring: Avatar, 50 pair of 3-D glasses and a 3-D capable TV) for the purpose of having a surprise wedding is sweet and hilarious and perfectly encapsulates April and Andy.

2. Ron and Tammy: Part Two (S3E4) – I couldn’t make this list without including at least one of the episodes where we get to see Ron interact with his second ex-wife (and real-life spouse Megan Mullally) Tammy 2. I picked a second one because of the ridiculously amusing gag of seeing Ron with corn rows and a mustache with a bald spot in the middle from “friction.” What puts this version of the Ron and Tammy saga on the list over the others is the B story where we learn about Ben’s paralyzing fear of policemen as he and Leslie position themselves to get a favor from Pawnee’s chief of police. It’s this episode where Ben starts to really learn what Leslie is all about. When he asks the police chief why he says that Leslie Knope gets all the favors she wants and he responds, “Because she’s the kind of person who uses favors to help other people.”

1. Flu Season (S3E2) – I realize that three of my five picks are from season three, but you have to understand that I believe that season three of Parks and Rec is the best season of TV sitcom ever. And Flu Season is 22 tight minutes of laughs and the crew splitting off into perfect comedic parings, Tom (Aziz Ansari) and Ben, April and Ann, and my personal favorite, Ron and Andy. Oh, and it also contains what show creator Michael Schur has called, and I agree with him, the funniest one liner in all seven seasons of the show, seen here.

I’m going to restrain myself from giving honorable mentions because I might list every other episode. What say you? What did I miss? What are your favorite episodes? Parks and Recreation can be streamed on Netflix. 


In the age of digital streaming, everyone has a show they want you to watch. Depending on how many seasons you’ve already missed, this can be a daunting proposition. This is why I’m always excited when someone recommends I watch a show and it has less than 20 episodes. I was able to watch Luther in a week! It happened again this week when a friend recommended I watch ABC’s Downward Dog. Downward Dog had a lot going for it. First, it stars Allison Tolman who is probably best known for her role as Molly Solverson on the first season of FX’s Fargo. Tolman is great. I’m a big fan. The conceit is also pretty intriguing. Picture a Modern Family/The Office/Parks and Recreation style mockumentary style sit-com, but the only character that does the talking head portions and the narration is a middle-aged dog who is going through an existential crisis. It’s fun in a way that, as my friend put it, it will never last. And my friend was right. It’s already been cancelled. But the best thing about it is that there are only 8 episodes. I watched the whole thing in an afternoon. It’s the perfect show to begin and finish watching over the summer while your other shows are on hiatus. It’s light, it moves quick and it’s really, really funny. It’s been cancelled by ABC, but the producers are reportedly shopping it around to other networks. It’s unique and different and every viewer counts. Downward Dog can be streamed on Hulu.


Shall We Begin? After what seemed like a lifetime but really was only a year, HBO’s Game of Thrones is back! Once the dust settled from a bloody first few minutes, the rest of the episode was spent moving the pieces into place for the rest of season seven and next year’s climactic season eight. By the looks of it, they’re not going to spend much time messing around. Cersei wants her kingdom back and isn’t going to take no for an answer. Jon needs dragon glass to defeat the Night’s King and, thanks to Sam, he’s about to find out that there’s a whole mess of it at Dragonstone. It looks like we’ll get to see the family reunion that we’ve all been looking forward to but Jon and his Aunt Daenerys don’t yet know is a thing, as the Mother of Dragons has just landed at, you guessed it, Dragonstone. You’ve also got Arya and Bran doing their thing, Sansa paying a little too much attention to Littlefinger and whatever it is that Uncle Greyjoy has up his sleeve. There are a lot of moving pieces and only 12 episodes left until it’s all over.

So what do you think is going to happen? Are Ms. Breaker of Chains and Mr. Snow going to kill the Lannisters on their way to defeat the White Walkers? Or do they need to form a tentative truce with Cersei to survive the winter? And what side is Jamie going to be on? My plan for Game of Thrones is to give a weekly, mostly spoiler free recap on Feelin’ Film TV with the opportunity for more in depth, spoiler-filled discussion in the comments and on our Facebook page. Game of Thrones airs Sunday nights on HBO and can be found streaming on the HBO Now and HBO Go platforms.

That’s all for now! As always, we want this to just be the start of our discussion. Feel free to contribute your thoughts in the comments or our Facebook group. Leave us your thoughts on my list or your predictions for this season of Game of Thrones. See you next week!