Feelin’ TV: November 27-December 3, 2017

Don’t be sad that it’s over, be thankful that it happened. The week of the Arrowverse’s annual crossover event is now over. And although my heart is a little sad that we won’t see these heroes all working together for another year, what we got in Crisis on Earth X was a wildly entertaining four hour block of television.

In the past, the crossover has been much like similar comic book scenarios where a three or four hour story is broken down to three or four different portions that take place from the lens of the show they’re on, for example, during Supergirl, Supergirl takes center stage, and so on and so forth. It worked pretty well last year, my only real squabble was that while we were promised a four-part crossover, Supergirl’s (the show, not the character) connection was only tangential as the connection to the rest of the universe came in the closing moments of what had been a standard episode of the show. This year, though, they went all in, even going so far to eschew the normal opening credits of each program for the crossover specific Crisis on Earth X name.  The result was a more unified story with a singular vision where every character was given the opportunity to shine. Even non-super characters like Felicity and Iris, normally regulated to speaking into the ears of Green Arrow and the Flash, respectively, had much of the resolution of the plot on their shoulders as the story went on. After doing this for the past couple of years, you can also sense there’s a comfortability with the casts of all four shows, which only added to the enjoy-ability of the event.

The plot of the crossover is simple. Oliver Queen crosses dimensions to steal the heart of Supergirl. Unfortunately, we’re not talking about romance here. In this scenario, the Oliver in question is a Nazi führer from Earth X who actually needs to steal the beating heart of Supergirl to save his wife, also Kara, known on their earth as Overgirl. It’s a fairly straight forward plan, which works in the crossover’s favor as it gives us a chance to get to the action. And the action is a real treat. By the time everyone in the Arrowverse is suited up in battle, I’ll admit to having goosebumps and a tear in my eye. It was a feeling similar to the ones I had when I first watched Avengers or a few weeks ago when I saw Justice League. The event built to its climax perfectly and the payoff was spectacular. Sure, it was cheesy and some of the CGI was poor, but I honestly can’t imagine it being pulled off any better.

I believe what put the event over the top, and I’ve talked about this before, was that the crossover had real stakes. That’s something I wasn’t expecting. When I began watching Supergirl on Tuesday, I had the thought, “This is going to be fun but ultimately the TV equivalent of empty calories because they surely won’t do anything to throw off the status quo of any of these four shows.” I’m happy to report that I was completely wrong. Before Crisis on Earth X was over we had not one, but two couples get married and one main character was dead. On that latter point, I was completely stunned. I expected someone good to die, but I expected it to be someone on the periphery to give the event the appearance of stakes without actually giving it any. Besides adding emotional depth to the entire undertaking, it also made the danger that our heroes were facing feel real. It was a brave choice, and while I’m sad to see the character go, it raised Crisis on Earth X from good to great. I totally can’t wait until next year! The Crisis on Earth X four-part event can be streamed on The CW app.

Channel Surfing:

  • Agents of SHIELD is BACK! And it was great! The two part season premiere of AoS aired this Friday with an opening act straight out of the Twilight Zone and a mystery that has the potential to really carry the season. The thing that impressed me the most about Agents of SHIELD this week was its production value. As I watched the cold open, I couldn’t help but think that it felt like I was watching a movie, not a network TV show. AoS gets a bad rap from a lot of people who never watched past the first season. Over the past few years it has matured into a pretty darn great show that deserves your attention if you’re into the drama. The new season of Agents of SHIELD can be viewed on Hulu.

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Programming note: I’m going to be taking a break from Feelin’ TV for the next 4-6 weeks while most shows are on break for the holidays and my wife and I prepare for the birth of our child. I appreciate you reading and look forward to returning in a few weeks. Happy Holidays, and I’ll see you next year!


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: November 20-26, 2017

Whenever a new movie/TV show is released based on a comic book property, the conversation about super hero fatigue begins. It gets louder every time, especially in months like this where the discussion around Thor: Ragnarok had barely died down before Justice League arrived in theaters. It’s completely understandable. A lot of people are burned out on the genre.
I do not suffer from that affliction. Give me more. I love the oversaturation. There is enough room in my heart for all of it. When I hear of something new, I’m all over it like white on rice in a glass of milk on a paper plate in a snow storm. I may not keep watching (Inhumans), I may quit watching and go back later because I have nothing else to do (Gotham), I may even hate watch (The Walking Dead) but more often than not, I watch and enjoy and put it securely in my regular rotation. It should be no surprise then, that I took the opportunity this week to check out (and fall in love with) Hulu’s new comic book series, Runaways.
Runaways is based on the Marvel comic of the same name. It’s set in the MCU along with the popular films and shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Inhumans, Daredevil, etc. It’s about six teenagers who find out that their parents are super villains who make up a team called Pride and begin to work together to thwart their plans. Along this journey of discovery, they also begin to develop powers of their own. I haven’t read the comic, so if you have, you probably have a better handle on what’s going on than I do at this point. From what I’ve read, fans of the print version have been pleased with the way the show has remained faithful to the source material. In the three episodes that have been released, creators Joshua Schwartz and Stephanie Savage have succeeded in crafting solid characters, both in the teens and their parents, not sacrificing the development of the villains in favor of the heroes. They’ve done so by taking their time to introduce characters and the world that they live in.
Hulu has been putting out some solid programming over the last few years. They seem to be a bit more concerned with quality over quantity in contrast to fellow streaming service Netflix. Thus far, Runaways continues that trend. It feels like more than an attempt to capitalize on the superhero craze. They’re laying the groundwork for a pretty intriguing story that I’m excited to add to the queue moving forward. Runaways is available on Hulu.

Channel Surfing:

  • The Arrowverse has a pretty big week coming up with their annual week of crossover episodes, so I had assumed that this week would mostly be table setting for that event. I was wrong. Supergirl saw the bittersweet return of Mon-El, The Flash came face to face with this season’s big bad The Thinker, Legends of Tomorrow had maybe the best Mick centered episode of the series and Oliver got arrested and vigilantes were made illegal in Star City on Arrow. But all of that will be on hold this week when all of the gang gets together for Barry and Iris’ wedding. Will everything run smoothly? Given that the whole ordeal is called Crisis on Earth-X, I’m guessing it won’t. It’s a tough thing to balance 4 shows into one storyline, but last season it was the best week of the year. Hopefully they can keep it up. Arrowverse shows can be seen on The CW.
  • This Is Us made me cry again this week. Chrissy Metz and Mandy Moore (Kate and Rebecca, respectively) play the two characters that get under my skin the most on that show (in a good way, like how members of your own family get under your skin). This week though, the story gave them both a chance to absolutely shine and they knocked it out of the park. I’ve heard people say that maybe the show leans a bit too heavy into sadness territory, and I think that’s a valid criticism, but I think the way it was portrayed this week was sensitive, thoughtful and accurate. Also, I’m going to start a petition to get NBC to give Toby his own show. I don’t care what it’s about. I just want more Toby. This Is Us airs weekly on NBC and past episodes can be seen on Hulu.

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Next week, we’re going to spend the bulk of our time talking about the Arrowverse crossover event and I’ll probably have a thing or two to say about the season premiere of the new season of Agents of SHIELD as well.


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: November 13-19, 2017

Just when things were starting to look pretty bleak for Netflix’s Marvel shows (Marvel Streaming Universe? Daredevilverse? Defendersverse?), Frank Castle arrived on the scene to single handedly put things back on track. After an unfortunate spring and summer that saw both Iron Fist and Defenders widely panned (I thought both were merely fine), there were legitimate questions about whether or not the universe had lost its magic. But The Punisher, released this past Friday on the streaming service, returned to not only prove that there were good stories yet to be told in this world, but that the best might still be yet to come. After Jon Bernthal’s portrayal of the brutal vigilante became the breakout character of Daredevil’s sophomore season, fans were pleased to hear that Netflix granted the anti-hero his own show. Recent deficiencies in storytelling had me apprehensive about the quick turnaround from breakout character to main player. Those fears proved to be unfounded. Not only did creator Steve Lightfoot create an intense and compelling season of television, they managed to find a cure to some of the ills that have plagued all of the other Netflix Marvel series.

The story is pretty straight forward. Just when Frank Castle believes his quest to avenge the death of his wife and children has ended, as he’s settled in to live a life of anonymity, he discovers that the plot that ended with the destruction of his world goes deeper than he imagined. Along with a few allies that he picks up along the way, Frank sets out on a mission to finish the job. There are two things that really set this simple revenge story apart, the themes and the performances.

The Punisher is brutal. The combat is up close and personal. But the story doesn’t revel in the violence (mostly). It uses the violence to speak to issues like gun control, PTSD and the difficulties our veterans face when they return home from war. It doesn’t simply pay these issues lip service nor does it provide easy answers. No punches are pulled in the series’ attempts to show the miserable care that our soldiers receive when they return home from our country’s perpetual overseas conflicts. The effects of PTSD are seen in the lives of Frank and others in heartbreaking detail. It refuses to provide simple solutions to the issues of gun violence and gun control, but weighs both sides without being didactic.

Jon Bernthal leads a stellar cast that slide into their roles with ease. Castle is the role that Bernthal was born to play. He’s believable in his intensity in focus but also in his portrayal of Frank’s special brand of compassion. Ben Barnes is an actor I’ve never been very impressed with, but he’s outstanding as Castle’s old military buddy Billy Russo. Barnes plays Russo in such a way that you’re never quite sure if he’s friend or foe. He’s charming and slimy all in one. Ebon Moss-Bachrach portrays Castle’s ally Micro (the comic’s Microchip) with an exasperated desperation as he helps Frank to settle a score of his own. Amber Rose Revah mirrors Castle’s driven and obsessed personality as Department of Homeland Security agent Dinah Madani. Deborah Ann Woll returns to the universe as Karen Page and is probably as good as she’s ever been. The breakout performance in my opinion belonged to Daniel Webber, a young vet struggling to readjust to life after war. His story exists outside of the main conflict, but it helps the show avoid the midseason lull that fans of this world are used to at this point. Almost every other season could have afforded to have 2-3 fewer episodes to cut the fat and make their stories tighter, but I never felt that way with The Punisher and a lot of that is due to Webber’s solid performance. He was one of the brightest spots of Hulu’s 2016 series 11.22.63 as Lee Harvey Oswald, and I’m hoping that this role will give him bigger opportunities in the future because he’s really great.

To reiterate, The Punisher is not for the faint of heart. It’s absolutely brutal. But if you can stomach it, you’ll find a surprisingly thoughtful and poignant show that entertains while also having some thoughtful reflection on issues ripped straight from current headlines. If you’re a fan of the character or the universe he exists in, I can’t imagine you won’t enjoy The Punisher. The Punisher is currently streaming on Netflix.

Channel Surfing:

  • I’d like to take some space and talk about the Arrowverse, but I really can’t even remember what happened this week. Slade Wilson came back to Arrow, but it was a pretty bland story that didn’t really go anywhere. The door is open for his return, so maybe there’s more to come with Deathstroke. And Diggle finally came clean with Team Arrow about his shoulder issues. I’m guessing Curtis will have a microchip that fixes the issue installed in his armpit by the end of the next episode.
  • I don’t normally give up on TV shows. Sometimes if I do, I end up catching up anyway (looking at you Gotham) but I’ve got two shows that are on life support. I’ve never hidden my disdain for The Walking Dead in this space, and I’ve decided to give it until the mid-season finale to do something interesting before I quit altogether. I’m not holding my breath. The other show I’m about done with is Riverdale. The first season was outstanding but season 2 has been a total slog. I’m struggling to care about any of the characters and the story is an absolute bore. It’s saving grace at this point is that it’s on Wednesday nights and I have very little to watch on Wednesdays.
  • The Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg penned Future Man starring Josh Hutcherson dropped this week on Hulu and I thought it was pretty good. It’s really funny and has a lot of fun easter eggs for the lover of sci-fi movies. It’s not a show for kids. But you should’ve guessed that when I told you who the creators are.
  • I’m hearing good things about Netflix’s Alias Grace. If you’ve seen it, I’d love to hear your thoughts. I’ll try to catch up with it over the holidays.

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Next week we’ll get a chance to talk about Marvel’s The Runaways! Happy Thanksgiving! I’m thankful for all of you who read this every week!


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: October 30-November 5, 2017

I think that a mark of a good show is its re-watchability. Sometimes I’ll love something the first time, but when I have a chance to watch it over again, I have little to no interest. Some shows, like The Office, Parks and Recreation or 30 Rock for example, are shows that I can watch and enjoy, start to finish, over and over again. Then, there’s the rarest of rare shows that get better every time you watch. I’m talking about Arrested Development.

I watched AD for at least the 5th or 6th time this week and I’m still blown away by it. There are set ups in season one that aren’t paid off until season three. There are gags that run further than any other gags in television history. There are things that make me laugh that I can’t even tell if its intentional or not (is it weird to anyone else that they refer to jelly beans as “candy beans”?) In previous viewings, I’ve been blown away by the intricacy of the story, enamored with the ability of Will Arnett and Jessica Walter to take over every scene they’re in as Gob and Lucile, the awkward existence of Michael Cera as George Michael and the creepy energy of David Cross as Tobias. This time though, I couldn’t stop admiring the straight man, Jason Bateman’s Michael Bluth.

The Bluth’s are wildly un-relatable. They’re rich, oblivious, and as characters, they’re ridiculously broad. I love each and every one of them, but I don’t think I would have been able to put up with them for more than an episode or two without Michael Bluth there to keep the show grounded…sort of. Through 3 seasons and 53 episodes (the Netflix season doesn’t count), whenever the rest of the Bluths threatened to take the show too far over the line into Crazy Town, Michael was there with a look or a perfectly timed quip to bring us right back down to earth. One of the biggest failings in Netflix’s attempt to bring the show back for a season four in my opinion is that Michael was as nuts as the rest of his family, losing its tether to normal people altogether. In a show full of perfectly cast characters, there may have been no one more perfectly suited to the show than Jason Bateman. If you haven’t seen it, I encourage you to give it a shot. If you have seen it, watch it again to rediscover its brilliance. Season five is coming in 2015 with a promise of episodes in the vein of seasons 1-3 and less season 4. Here’s hoping that’s the case. Arrested Development is available to stream on Netflix.

Channel Surfing:

  • The Arrowverse had a great week with a crazy fun episode of Supergirl involving Kara and Jonn flying a convertible to Mars, a Legends of Tomorrow that wrapped a tale about Ray Palmer’s childhood into an homage to ET and The Flash introduced Elongated Man into its universe. The best news this week though? MICHAEL EMERSON IS A BAD GUY ON ARROW! His character at this point seems to be the master of manipulation that we saw in Lost’s Ben Linus combined with the tech savy expertise of Person of Interest’s Mr. Finch. There may have been an audible squeal of glee in my living room when he showed up. This has been a stellar season all-around for the Arrowverse, and with Emerson around, it looks like it will continue trending up. The current season of Arrow, Supergirl, The Flash, and Legends of Tomorrow can be viewed on The CW app.
  • Thursday night NFL football is the worst. The games are always subpar because of the quick turnaround and the matchups are typically pretty lame. The worst part though, is that because of NBC’s commitment to Thursday Night Football, we don’t get to see any new episodes of The Good Place or Great News until the new year. Maybe it’s just sour grapes, but I hate TNF. Well, unless the Chiefs are playing. If you’re like me and you can see The Good Place withdrawals in your future, check out this video taken by Kristen Bell of the rest of the cast finding out about season one’s epic twist (spoilers, obvs).
  • I was remarking to a friend this week that out of all of my friends with kids, I don’t know anyone who has ever had a baby without making it to the hospital first (not counting my slightly crazy friends who have had their kids at home on purpose). But if my calculations are correct, roughly 90% of TV children are born that way. A This Is Us flashback added Randall’s oldest child to that statistic this week. It’s a pretty worn out trope, but overall, it was a strong episode that made me cry so I’ll forgive them for going to that well.
  • Oh, and The Walking Dead was awful. I’m going to need someone to spend some time in the Facebook group telling me why I should still be interested in this show.

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Happy viewing!


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: October 23-29, 2017

Stranger Things returned last weekend after unprecedented levels of hype for its much anticipated second season on Netflix. I was excited, you were excited, everyone was excited to see the next chapter of supernatural happenings in Hawkins, Indiana. In this viewer’s opinion, Stranger Things 2 lives up to the hype and maybe even surpasses it, providing 9 episodes jam-packed with expert world-building, top-notch story-telling, fantastic performances and loads of 80’s nostalgia. Because of the nature of the shows release, and the knowledge that not everyone has had the chance to watch the entire season yet, our review today will be spoiler free. If you don’t want to know anything at all about the season, I’d slide on down to the Channel Surfing portion of this column, but if you’re just avoiding spoilers, proceed with confidence. And if you’re looking for a place to discuss the show in depth without holding back, let’s chat on Facebook.

Stranger Things 2 succeeds primarily because it succeeds in all of the ways that it did when it took the TV world by storm in 2016. With a story that feels like it could have come straight out of the period, the show plays to our desire for nostalgia without feeling like an appeal to score cheap points with the audience. Like season one, the situation our characters find themselves in feels like it could have come from the mind of Steven Spielberg or Stephen King without being a blatant rip-off of either creator.

To avoid spoilers, I’m going to avoid talking about plot and focus on character. For all of its creepy plot and throwbacks to 80’s movies, to me what makes Stranger Things stand apart is its characters. While most of America (understandably) fell in love with Eleven and Mike (Millie Bobby Brown and Finn Wolfhard, respectively) during season one, I was immediately enamored with the foul-mouthed, wildly enthusiastic spark plug Dustin, played by the incomparable Gaten Matarazzo. Season 2 capitalizes on his irresistible charm by giving us more Dustin early and often. And in a stroke of storytelling genius, much of the season sees him paired up with the character who saw the largest measure of redemption last season, the slimy other-man with a heart of gold, Steve Harrington. Joe Keery is delightful as Steve, who becomes a mentor/reluctant babysitter to Dustin and his friends. The time spent with these two together really sings. I’ve remarked on social media since completing the season that I’m lobbying for a spin-off where Steve somehow becomes Dustin’s guardian. I don’t know what they’d do, some people have suggested that they should be private detectives or just pick-up artists, but I’d be all-in on that show.

The second character highlight to me this season was the addition of Sean Astin to the cast as Bob Newby, the nerdy love interest for Winona Ryder’s Joyce Byers. I’ve heard the Duffer brothers talk about how they didn’t have a large role for the character, but Astin’s appeal and charm caused them to expand the role. I think you’d have a hard time finding anyone who thinks that was a bad decision. Besides the meta aspect of his casting as the former leader of the Goonies, an obvious influence on Stranger Things, Astin brings an earnestness and commitment to the role that puts Bob the Brain in the conversation with Rudy Ruettiger and Mikey Walsh for the second-best performance in his long career (let’s face it, Samwise Gamgee will always be #1).

Overall, other than a late standalone episode that didn’t quite feel like it belonged (you’ll know it when you get there), I really have no complaints about the season. It was everything I had hoped it would be based on what we got from season one. There are bigger stakes, a bigger cast and a bigger foe, but it’s all handled wonderfully to create a satisfying second season. Now it’s time to wait impatiently for the third.  Stranger Things can be streamed in its entirety on Netflix.

Channel Surfing:

  • The Walking Dead squandered any goodwill it might have gained during the premiere with one of its all time worst episodes. The only redeeming factor is that rather than sitting around and having conversations that we’ve already had over and over again, they were shooting people while they were having conversations that we’ve already had over and over again.  I think that at the end, we’re supposed to think that something bad is around the corner, but I couldn’t tell you exactly why. There’s someone named Morales who it appears I’m supposed to remember who has gotten the drop on Rick. There was a walkie-talkie discovered by Carol and friends that apparently means something bad. Someone else got shot in the stomach and the music indicated to me that I’m supposed to care. I’m not sure why. I believe that the show-runners think that they have  created a world with many rich and fully fleshed out characters, but in reality there are 6-7 characters that we care about, and everyone else might as well be a walker. I don’t have any idea who Morales is. I think the guy who got shot in the stomach is the husband of the guy with the curly hair. I’m really not sure. And that’s a problem. But at least someone got mauled by a tiger. The current season of The Walking Dead can be streamed on the AMC app. 
  • Can you imagine a show that featured Dana Carvey, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Louis CK and Robert Smigel? Did you know it really happened? It was at the height of Dana Carvey’s career after leaving Saturday Night Live in the mid 90’s and it was a complete and total flop. Airing on ABC, The Dana Carvey Show created 8 episodes and aired only 7 before the plug was pulled by the network that had only recently been acquired by Disney. The story of its failure is now being told in the great new documentary presented by Hulu called Too Funny To Fail. Full of clips from the show and interviews with the cast, the doc provides a fun oral history into the show’s creation, production and cancellation in the spring and summer of 1996. I haven’t seen The Dana Carvey Show (although I do plan on watching it on Hulu having seen this doc), but as a fan of all of the aforementioned cast, I found it to be a really fun way to spend 90 minutes. I highly recommend it. Too Funny To Fail is currently streaming on Hulu.  

That’s all for this week. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Join in the conversation about Stranger Things 2 or the Arrowverse there too. Happy viewing!


Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: October 16-22, 2017

I want to start off this week’s Feelin’ TV with a confession. I don’t really like The Walking Dead anymore. I watch it because I’ve been watching it this long so I might as well finish it. I watch it because people around me watch it and I don’t want to be out of the loop at the water cooler (at my office, it’s an ice machine). I watch it because I hope it will get better, but as I sat down to watch the season eight premiere, I was finding it hard to be optimistic. I say all of this because I want to let you in on my head space when it comes to TWD. It’s currently a show that has to win me back.  And it’s going to take more than one episode to do so. But after watching the premiere, I think it’s on the right track.

The best thing that this week’s episode did was that it jumped right into action. One of TWD’s biggest issues has been pacing and taking a ridiculously long time to work up to inevitable conflict. There have been times, like in season two, where I’ve thought the writers were trying to make the audience feel as miserable as the characters with its plodding pace. So I took the promise of all out war this season with a grain of salt. From the opening minutes though, we see the preparations for war, as Maggie and Ezekiel, leaders of the Hilltop and the Kingdom, respectively, join Rick in giving a (only slightly expository and on the nose) speech before heading off to war against Neegan and his Saviors. Before the episode ends, we see them pull off a well-planned and methodically executed plan to do so. It stands in stark opposition to Rick’s typical reactionary nature. It was something different, and for a show that tends to get stuck in the same rut, anything different is good. It was also fun to see everyone working together again. There was so much segmentation last season that we rarely got to see the shows best characters interact with each other.  But seeing Carol, Daryl and Morgan working together was great, and I hope that can be something that continues over the next few months.

I didn’t love everything about it. Carl still exists. He hasn’t gotten a haircut. Michonne is left back at home and not a part of the action taking down the Saviors. Maybe there’s a plan for her, but I fear that she will continue to be criminally under-utilized as she was in season seven. Much of the dialogue are lines that look way better on paper than they sound spoken out loud. But there’s enough about it to like that I’m cautiously optimistic for the future. If you’re a fan of The Walking Dead and want to dig deeper into its themes from week to week, I’d suggest following Gene Gosewehr’s weekly recaps here at Reel World Theology (He’s also quite a bit more positive about the show than I am. He still likes Carl). Seasons 1-7 of The Walking Dead are currently streaming  on Netflix, and episodes from season 8 can be viewed on the AMC app.

Channel Surfing:

  • Arrow dropped a bombshell this week when Oliver invited John Diggle to take the mantle of the Green Arrow. I’m quite interested to see if they’re able to pull that trigger or whether Oliver will find a way to balance his family, public and nocturnal lives in a way that satisfies his conscience as a father and remain the Green Arrow after all. If he indeed does pass the hood to Dig, I’ll be quite impressed with the show-runners, as having your main character make a change of that magnitude is rare. The first hurdle will be the effects of Diggle’s nerve damage and if he’ll be able to physically pull off the transition. But Ollie doesn’t even know about that yet, so we’ll see. The current season of Arrow can be streamed on The CW app.
  • I had heard enough good things about NBC’s Great News that I decided to give it a watch this week. Created by Tracy Wigfield and produced by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, all of 30 Rock fame (among other things), it definitely has the DNA and frenetic 100-jokes-a-minute pace of 30 Rock. It would be easy to label it as 30 Rock in a newsroom, but I think that’s a bit too dismissive. It stars Briga Heelan as Katie Wendelson, a young producer for a struggling news cast called The Breakdown. Her mother, played perfectly by Andrea Martin, is hired as an intern for the same newscast after being inspired to go back to school to follow her dreams, and as they say, hijinks ensue. John Michael Higgins plays self-absorbed co-anchor Chuck Pierce with all of the flare that you expect from the reliable comedy actor. If you love him as the a capella podcaster extraordinaire in the Pitch Perfect films, and of course you do, you’ll love him here. The biggest surprise to me has been Nicole Richie as Higgins’ co-anchor, Portia Scott-Griffith. Her comedic instincts and timing are nearly perfect as the young, hip (at one point she shares that she spent her weekend seeing The Weeknd at a new club called Weekend) and oblivious yin to Higgins’ old-school, stodgy and oblivious yang. The show takes aim at the ridiculous world of cable news and hits a lot more than it misses. The second season has been especially sharp as Tina Fey joined the cast as the network CEO who takes our main character under her wing as a mentee (ok, maybe it’s an awful lot like 30 Rock). If you’re a 30 Rock fan, I can’t imagine you wouldn’t also very much enjoy this show as well. The first season was only 10 episodes long and the second has only aired 4 so far, so you’re not too far behind if you haven’t started yet. All of Great News can be streamed on Hulu.
  • And we’ll close with your weekly reminder that you should be watching The Good Place. This past week was probably the funniest and sharpest that the show has been as they tackled the classic thought exercise, the trolley problem, with hilarious results. Everyone aspect of this show is currently firing on all cylinders. Get on board now before you’re too far behind. The current season of The Good Place can be streamed on Hulu.That’s all for this week. Next week we get to talk about Stranger Things 2! It’s all happening! As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. Happy viewing!

Jeremy Calcara is a contributing member of the Feelin’ Film team. In addition watching as many movies as he can and writing reviews for Feelin’ Film, Jeremy consumes an unhealthy amount of television and writes about it weekly in his Feelin’ TV column.   Follow him on Facebook and Twitter  to be notified when new content is posted.

Feelin’ TV: October 9-15, 2017

The biggest news in my TV watching world this week is that the CW’s Arrowverse kicked back into action after the summer layoff. These aren’t the best shows that I watch every week, but they’re probably the ones that I most look forward to. Each of them went through spells where they were uninspired and drab, but they’ve also had some impressively high highs. If you haven’t watched before and you like properties based on comic books, I’d suggest giving them a shot. But if you just want to jump right in, the next few paragraphs will give you a bit of where we’ve been and a quick note or two on where the season premieres seem to say that we’re going.

Supergirl ended its second season overall (and first season in the Arrowverse on The CW) in gut-wrenching fashion. In order to save National City and the world from the invasion of the Daxamites, Team Supergirl was forced to take measures that meant the love of Kara’s life, Mon-El the Daxamite, wouldn’t be able to live in the earth’s atmosphere anymore. Our season premiere picks up a few months after that decision with Kara still unable to handle her feelings. She throws herself into her life as Supergirl and neglects her responsibilities as Kara like her job, to her friends and her family. She’s facing an interesting question: If she’s going to continue to have to give up the things that make Kara happy for the greater good, then what is the point of the altar-ego in the first place. It isn’t the first time this line of thinking has been explored in the superhero genre, but it’s handled well because of a predictably great performance by Melissa Benoist. She has the ability to give Supergirl vulnerability without it coming off as weakness that is just a joy to watch every week. Season three brings a few new faces that will be familiar to longtime fans of super-hero TV about as well.  Adrian Pasdar (of Heroes and Agents of SHIELD fame) appears to be taking up the mantle as this season’s baddie Morgan Edge and Erica Durance (Smallville’s Lois Lane, taking Laura Benanti’s role) slides in to a supporting role as Supergirl’s Kryptonian mother, alive only in dreams and holograms, Alura Zor-El. If there’s one thing I didn’t love about the episode, its’s the way that everything gets set back to the status quo by the end of the premiere rather than letting things linger. These are complex issues that Kara is dealing with, so it would be nice to see it take a bit of time to resolve. It’s something that the Arrowverse does pretty often, and this season appears to be no different. It will be a recurring theme this week.

Speaking of a refusal to let things linger, The Flash returned this week as well. At the end of last season, Barry successfully thwarted Zoom’s plot to kill Iris West, but had to exile himself to the Speed Force Prison to keep the universe from being destroyed (it was a whole thing, I’m not sure I could explain it). If I’m being honest, it was kind of a dumb way to get Barry removed from the equation, but I was looking forward to seeing Team Flash in action for a few episodes this season until Barry’s inevitable return, provided the writers had the guts to keep him away for a while. But they did not.  Of course a villain came to town that promised to destroy Central City unless the real Flash faced him. Of course Sisco had been working on a way to bring him back that was just about done (it’s as if the writers totally forgot that the show tried to sell Barry’s banishment as permanent). Of course it worked, admittedly with some side effects. And of course, the side effects were a-okay by the end of the episode. It was an unfortunate development even though I’m a big fan of Grant Gustin’s Barry Allen and I like having him around. But when the consequences of a character’s decisions last for less than an hour in TV runtime, it’s pretty hard to believe that any of the stakes are very high. All of that being said, most of last season (and the season before that) was pretty mediocre to poor, so if hitting the reset button a little too quickly gets us to the fun Flash of season one as the writers are promising, then I’ll eat crow. We’ll need some more context to see if that’s the case.

At least The Flash took a whole episode to press reset. Legends of Tomorrow did it before the first commercial break. When we last left the Legends, they had returned to the present day only to see that time had gone crazy. There were dinosaurs in the streets for crying out loud! But not a minute after the “Previously on” segment, Rip Hunter shows up with his new team of time fixers, who take care of everything effectively and efficiently, and disbands the Legends. Each of our heroes find themselves in the middle of a mundane existence that they can hardly stand (one that looks a lot like yours and mine), but they’re given a reason to regroup when Mick Rory runs into Julius Caesar on his vacation in Aruba. The group proceeds to attempt to take him back to his time, make a mess of things, and then clean it up again. Legends is one show where I don’t mind the quick reset. Each season so far has seemed like its own thing to the show’s credit. It isn’t a show that asks the deep questions. It’s a show about a bunch of heroes that travel through time and screw stuff up. It’s not going to win any Emmy’s, but it might just be the most enjoyable show that I watch every week. Having a season by season arc rather than carrying past seasons worth of baggage keeps the show light and fun.

Arrow returned after an explosive (pun intended because, let’s admit it, all puns are intended) finale that saw Oliver watching in horror as an island with all of Team Arrow blew up before his very eyes. The finale gave us little in the way of hope that anyone other than Ollie survived. But, hey, this is Arrow not Game of Thrones, so season three quickly assures us that everyone is okay (well, Oliver’s son William’s mom died, but we didn’t know her really and Thea is in a coma, but still). That didn’t make me upset because there’s no one on Team Arrow that I don’t like, but again, like The Flash, it keeps the stakes pretty low. The rest of the episode was really solid though with Bad Laurel back from the dead to wreak havoc on Star City’s police department and someone finally outs Oliver as Green Arrow on the news for all to see. Now unless the Legends of Tomorrow show up and use their Men In Black style flashy-thingy on the whole city, things are going to get pretty difficult for Ollie. Throw on the added difficulty that he’s experiencing as a new single father, and you have the makings of a pretty good arc for Arrow’s sixth season. While Arrow has had its issues, I believe that season five really put the show back on track. The biggest difference has been Oliver Queen’s growth as a character. He seems to be in a position to grow even further this year.

Previous seasons for all four shows in the Arrow universe can be streamed on Netflix. Episodes from the current season can be found on The CW app. 

Channel Surfing:

  • Riverdale also returned to The CW this week in a premiere that picks up literally minutes after the finale left off. Riverdale was last season’s most surprising show in that from the outside looking in it appeared to be just another CW drama in a long line of CW dramas that I had no interest in. But by grounding the story in the rich world of the Archie comics and presenting a solid mystery with great performances from a young cast, it completely surpassed my expectations. I’m interested to see if the tension can be sustained now that last season’s arc is complete. The questions about the identity of Fred Andrews’ killer and whether or not Jughead joins the Serpents don’t grab me nearly as much as the mystery surrounding the disappearance and death of Jason Blossom. We’ll see if they can bring in a little more intrigue here in the next few weeks. Mark Consuelos’ addition to the cast as the slimy Hiram Lodge is a good start. The first season of Riverdale can be found streaming on Netflix and the season premiere is now available on the CW app.
  • Halt and Catch Fire ended this past weekend with a solid 2 hour finale. I hesitated to mention it here because I plan on writing more on it later, but it was too perfect not to mention. In the beginning of the episode, Lee Pace’s Joe McMillan recalls a time when he told Scoot McNairy’s now deceased Gordon Clark that the advent of the personal computer wasn’t “the thing” but that it was “the thing that gets you to the thing.” In the context of his speech, “the thing” is the internet. But the finale shows how that idea of “the thing that gets you to the thing” has been weaved throughout the tapestry of the show from the very beginning. In the end we see that the thing at the end isn’t nearly as satisfying as the thing that got you there. In the case of Halt and Catch Fire, that thing is the relationships between the five core characters. While Joe, Cam, Donna, Gordon and Boz have experienced love and hate and everything in between over the course of almost 15 years, they’ve also been constant in each others’ lives, spurring each other on towards growth and maturity. The characters in the finale would be nearly unrecognizable to the characters in the series premiere. But that isn’t the case because of poor writing that isn’t true to the characters, it’s the case because each of them has experienced tremendous growth. It’s not often that I get sad when a show ends because there are so many out there that I keep up with, but I’m going to miss Halt and Catch Fire. Seasons 1-3 of Halt and Catch Fire can be viewed on Netflix and season 4 can be streamed on the AMC app with your cable subscription.

That’s all for this week. That was a long one! Next week, The Walking Dead is back and we’re less than two weeks away from Stranger Things 2! If you’re an Arrowverse fan, come talk about the shows in our weekly Facebook Arrowverse thread. As always, if there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group. I really do listen! I didn’t start watching Halt and Catch Fire until I heard about it from someone in the group, so keep those suggestions coming.

Feelin’ TV: October 2-8, 2017

There’s a long and sordid history to the relationship between Marvel and 20th Century Fox when it comes to mutants. Marvel had the mutants, Fox bought the mutants, Fox made lots of money off of the mutants, Marvel would like to have the mutants back, but Fox, understandably, is a fan of making all of the money. In lieu of mutants, Marvel inserted Inhumans (who are pretty much space mutants as opposed to genetic mutants) into its MCU via the Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD program and had solid results that helped the show find its voice. Now Fox has its mutants and Marvel has its mutants and because everything now gets made into a television show, we’ve come to this; a 2017 Fall TV Battle Royale of mutants featuring ABC’s Inhumans versus Fox’s The Gifted

The Gifted was a tight little pilot that told us what we needed to know about the world. Mutants exist, but they’re illegal and they’re being hunted. Our main characters are the Strucker’s. Reed Strucker is a lawyer who helps prosecute mutants, his son Andy’s struggle with being bullied reveals latent mutant powers, his daughter Lauren reveals mutant powers she’s been hiding to rescue her brother, and now the family is on the run to Mexico with a group of mutants that Mr. Strucker was previously trying to put behind bars. It’s short and sweet and to this point, uncomplicated. It succeeds because it focuses on character and not on spectacle. The cast is led by the amazing Amy Acker as Kate, the matriarch of the Strucker family. The way they make the decision on a dime to leave their life behind to protect their children and live as fugitives and the fact that they don’t really have any idea how to live life on the run rings true to life and immediately makes them feel like a real family. What makes X-Men so great is that behind all of the world saving are small stories of people learning to be unafraid of who they are. The Gifted appears to understand that and I’m very much looking forward to the rest of the season.

Inhumans is an absolute mess. They live on the moon apparently, and they have a king and queen and some sort of ruling counsel, but there’s been a power struggle recently and there is some unrest. The king is Black Bolt and his queen is Medusa. They appear happy together, but the king’s brother Maximus (played by Game of Thrones’ Iwan Rheon) thinks that they should be living on earth for…reasons…and he’s sure enough that he’s right that he stages a coup to seize control of the kingdom. Unfortunately for him, his plan to have his brother and sister in law arrested backfires and instead they’re taken to earth by the queen’s sister, who has all-time bad hair, and her giant teleporting dog. If that seems at all clear, then the show should hire me as a writer because it’s not at all clear on the screen. Adding to the poorly told story are multiple groan worthy performances, eye-roll inducing levels of blurted out exposition and fight choreography that immediately reminded me of my early teenage obsession with the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. It’s awful, it’s terrible, and I don’t know if I’ll watch anymore because I hated it.

I’m not usually one to totally give up on a show after one episode, but if Inhumans vs. The Gifted were a boxing match, Inhumans fell twice and was saved by the bell from a TKO in the first round. The difference in the quality, acting, direction, effects, etc. between the two shows was night and day. So to summarize: If you’re only going to watch one show about mutants this season, watch The Gifted. If you’re going to watch two, watch The Gifted twice. Both The Gifted and Inhumans can be streamed on Hulu.com.

 

Channel Surfing:

  • This Is Us is officially 2 for 2 in making me cry in this young season. I had someone ask me this week what makes the show so good and my answer was simply that it feels more real than most television. Things don’t come easy for these characters. They make decisions to do things and they fall on their face. But they always get back up again with help from their family. I know that not everyone has that experience with their families, but I’m blessed to be able to say that I do. And the family on This Is Us reminds me of my family. We can be intrusive and annoying and neurotic, but we’re also always there. Season 2 is off to a good start. This Is Us can be streamed at Hulu.com or at NBC.com.
  • Designated Survivor is back and it’s still not a good show. But it’s pretty fun. One large dangling thread from season one was wrapped up this week, but I’m sure something else bad will be coming down the pike pretty soon. If this show becomes West Wing, it will be unwatchable. It’s a show that blew up the Capitol in the cold open of it’s pilot. It’s stakes need to be ridiculous, so I hope they keep it that way.
  • I caught a new show this week that I’m hoping will stick around long enough to stick around for a while called Kevin (Probably) Saves the World. It stars Jason Ritter as Kevin, a down on his luck former high school hot shot who returns to his hometown to live with his twin sister and her daughter after the death of her husband. I don’t want to say more, I just want you to watch it. The pilot was the perfect combo of funny and heart-warming and it was the second show of the week to make me cry. Kevin (Probably) Saves the World can be streamed at Hulu.com or at ABC.com.
  • I’m going to recommend a documentary that you can check out on Netflix even though that’s probably technically out of my lane. But it’s only 40 minutes long, so it’s like a 1 hour TV special, which would be in my lane. It’s called Long Shot and I’m not going to tell you anything about it except that it’s intriguing and surprising and absolutely delightful. Don’t read about it or watch Netflix’s trailer, just watch the show. You can thank me later.

That’s all for this week. Next week, the Arrowverse is back! I’m sure I’ll have plenty to say about that. If there’s anything you’d like me to check out that we haven’t covered, let me know in the comments or in the Facebook group.

Feelin’ TV: September 25-October 1

I don’t really care about the Emmy’s. Every year the Oscar’s give me a few movies to add to my watchlist, but the Emmy’s very rarely move the needle for me as far as my viewing habits. I could be wrong, but it always seems to me like once a show or an actor gets honored with the award, they’re continuously honored in perpetuity until the show ends its run while other deserving shows are ignored. And if I’m being honest, I’m a little bitter that Parks & Recreation went 0-16 at the Emmys during its seven seasons. But this year, as I was hearing all of the buzz after the ceremony for Big Little Lies, I looked at the dynamite cast and the well-regarded show runner and decided to give it a try. In doing so, I may have started to care about the Emmy’s.

Big Little Lies, the adaptation of Liane Moriarty’s 2014 novel of the same name, tells the story about a death at an elementary school fundraiser in Monterey, California. The story is presented on two fronts. The primary way is through the main narrative that follows Madeline, Jane, Celeste and Renata (Reese Witherspoon, Shailene Woodley, Nicole Kidman and Laura Dern, respectively) from student orientation day at Pirriwee Public School all the way up to the fateful night of the murder. The secondary narrative is what we hear from ancillary characters describing the escalating tension between our four main characters over the time periods in their statements to the police. What makes Big Little Lies stand out from other murder mysteries is that not only is the audience unaware who the killer is, we’re also kept in the dark as to who the victim is. It’s great storytelling technique pulled off with near perfection by one of the most impressive casts I’ve seen in a television series. The four leads are fantastic. They’re confident, catty and delightfully willing to speak their minds to each other. The drama between the women always feels like the kind of actual real-world problems that mothers deal with every day. Make no mistake, these are women who are well-off living in paradise, but their issues are abuse, bullying and work life balance. As a parent, this helped me buy in immediately because I’ve dealt with the pain of a child being hurt in a manner that leaves those in charge of keeping him/her safe without any clue as to who caused the harm. I’ve gone the wrong way in the drop-off line and felt the condemning stares. I’ve seen little issues between parents become big issues because of the wrong thing said at the wrong time. Now no one is getting murdered at the fundraisers I attend, but I get the stakes. This isn’t your average network TV drama where every conflict could be solved if the characters involved took the time to have a 2-minute conversation.

The main cast, as you’d expect with names like Witherspoon, Kidman and Dern, is spectacular. Witherspoon’s Madeline stands out and reminds me of a grown-up Tracy Flick. She’s smart, dedicated, and she’ll play dirty if you cross her. Dern shines as Renata who is put in the unenviable position of being the villain of the story, at least where the interpersonal relationships are concerned. The men in the cast are great as well with stand-out performances by Adam Scott and Alexander Skarsgard. It’s also important to point out how solid Zoe Kravitz performs in a small but vital role as Bonnie, the young wife to Madeline’s ex-husband.

I don’t want to get into too many spoilers in this space because I’d rather you just watch the show. But my favorite thing about the series is the way shines a light on the strength of women. From little hiccups to giant problems, these are women who are more than capable to handle what life puts in their way. When the men in their lives attempt to fix these delicate issues like a man does, they serve to escalate things further. The men suffer from the classic dilemma of treating every problem like a nail because their only tool is a hammer. This show celebrates strong women and their ability to protect each other and get stuff done. It’s a phenomenal series that deserves every bit of praise it has received. Big Little Lies is currently streaming on the HBO GO and HBO NOW apps.

Channel Surfing:

  • Halt and Catch Fire had a devastating episode this week that absolutely wrecked me. No matter how much time is left in a series (H&CF has only 3 episodes left until its series finale) it takes some guts to make a move that totally changes the direction of your show and that’s what creators Christopher Cantwell and Christopher C. Rogers did this week. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again,  is the best show that you’re not watching. These next three weeks promise to be can’t miss TV. Past seasons of Halt and Catch Fire can be seen on Netflix and the current season can be streamed on the AMC app.
  • Speaking of shows that are unafraid to throw a wrench into the machine that totally changes the show, The Good Place did just that for the third time in its last three episodes. My favorite new show from last season is quickly becoming my favorite show on TV. If you haven’t watched it yet, I can’t express how much you’re missing out. Catch up on season one on Netflix and season two is streaming on Hulu and NBC.com.
  • Brooklyn Nine-Nine has occasionally ended their season by upsetting the apple cart, but typically they get everything back to the status quo by the end of the next season’s premiere. This season though, it appears that they’re willing to play with the Peralta and Diaz in prison storyline for a little while. And the show is the better for it. The season five premiere was among the best episodes the show has ever produced. Look, Jake and Rosa aren’t guilty and they’re not going to stay there forever, but with the amount of fun that Dan Goor and his writers were able to have with those scenes in particular, I hope it ends later rather than sooner. Brooklyn Nine-Nine can be seen on Hulu or at FOX.com
  • For all you Trekkies out there, we’d be remiss not to mention that Star Trek: Discovery launched last week with a two-part premiere. In the opening episodes we are introduced to Captain Philippa Georgiou (Michelle Yeoh), First Office Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green) and the crew of the  USS Shenzhou. Life in the Federation is pretty chill until the Klingons show back up and chaos ensues. These first two episodes serve as a great primer to the world we will be seeing in Discovery, and though I didn’t particularly love them, they made me curious enough to stick around for episode #3. In this week’s episode the show begins to reveal more of what the episodic storytelling nature may be going forward. This is an intense Star Trek, with a mysterious Captain in Gabriel Lorca (Jason Isaacs), horror-like moments reminiscent of the video game Doom 3, and an intriguing crew with vastly different personalities. It was great to finally be aboard the USS Discovery, as well, and see some of the interesting technology of this universe. I came away from the third episode fully onboard with the show and am now quite excited about where it goes from here. – Aaron  Star Trek: Discovery can be streamed through CBS All-Access

As always, if there’s anything you’d like to see covered that we’re not yet covering, let me know in the comments or on the Feelin’ Film discussion group. Thanks for reading!

Feelin’ TV: September 18-24

One of my favorite forms of entertainment are the kind that can exist to poke fun at a genre while also being a solid example of that genre. Shane Black movies like The Nice Guys or Kiss Kiss Bang Bang immediately come to mind as movies that revel in poking holes in the tropes of your average buddy action comedy while also being really enjoyable buddy action comedies. It’s difficult to pull off, so I appreciate when it’s done well. There have been several TV shows that have tried to do this with varying levels of success. Psych is the first one that comes to mind. As a spoof of detective shows it definitely leaned heavier on the comedy than the mystery, but it was mostly fun for 8 seasons. Fox’s new Seth Macfarlane vehicle The Orville seems like it has its sights set on straddling the line between parody and homage of Star Trek, although through three episodes, it strangely seems to be leaning more on the side of homage. A few weeks ago, to little fanfare, Netflix dropped a show that in this writer’s opinion is the best example of this type of program to date. That show is American Vandal.

In the past few years, we’ve become obsessed as a society with the true crime documentary. The first season of the podcast Serial was probably the spark that ignited the flame, but Netflix fanned the flame with shows like Making a Murderer as the subjects of these shows, Adnan Syed and Steven Avery respectively, became household names. American Vandal takes the concept of these stories, replaces murder with a hilarious lesser offense, and creates a world of colorful characters to round out a highly amusing and surprisingly insightful “true crime” documentary series. To tell you much more is to ruin the surprise, but suffice it to say the cast is incredible and the story that begins as farce eventually gets crafted into an intriguing mystery that will have you glued to your seat until it’s over. And along the way it gives the viewer a lot to think about as it examines high school culture in the age of social media in a way that both entertains and gives pause. The subject matter might be more than some can handle, but I couldn’t recommend it any higher. American Vandal is currently streaming on Netflix.

Channel Surfing:

  • The Good Place had its second season premiere this week and it started at the very moment that season one left off. Revelations made in the season one finale are really going to allow the writers to expand the world and play with its concept. I’m really excited to see what they have planned. If you haven’t watched The Good Place, I’d suggest you get on it. It was the best new show of 2016 and it doesn’t show any signs of losing that momentum. But don’t start in the middle. The first season is must watch and it’s only 13 episodes (all of which can be seen on Netflix). The season 2 premiere of The Good Place is currently streaming on Hulu.

 

  • I briefly mentioned The Orville before and I’m sure it will come up again in the near future. After 3 episodes, it’s safe to say that it isn’t at all what I was expecting. I don’t care for Seth Macfarlane. His smugness and tendency to take the easiest path to a laugh turn me away from most of his work. But The Orville has shown a significant amount of restraint to the point that I wish that there were more laughs to be had. It’s not that the jokes aren’t funny, they’re just barely there. It has some good pieces, but it’s still figuring out what it wants to be. You can catch up on what you’ve missed of The Orville on Hulu.

 

  • I’m three episodes in to HBO’s Emmy award winning drama Big Little Lies and all I can say so far is “Wow.” The cast is incredible (Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley and Laura Dern!) and the story grips you from the moment it starts. With a first episode titled “Somebody’s Dead” I was expecting a whodunnit murder mystery, but thus far we don’t even know who died. I can’t wait to get it finished. You can currently watch all of season one using HBO’s streaming service.

 

  • I’m not a Trekkie, so I’m probably not going to be watching the new Star Trek: Discovery. I know a lot of people are interested in the show, so if you’re watching and you have some quick thoughts, I’d love to hear them!

Well, we’re back after a short hiatus with a new format. We hope that you like it. We’ll be getting into the swing of things as the new TV season really fires up in earnest in the next couple of weeks. As always, if there’s anything you’d like to see covered that we’re not yet covering, let me know in the comments or on the Feelin’ Film discussion group. As of right now, I plan on covering all of the still running shows we covered at the end of last season with a few new additions (Gifted, Ghosted and Inhumans, among others). Is there anything I’m missing? Come join in the conversation in the Feelin’ Film Facebook group!